Welcome to the Italian Campaign Page

Open to Current Active B-17 Hop List Pilots and Pilots who have completed the Hop List

The Italian Campaign is flown in the P-47 

Pilots earn awards for completing The Italian Campaign as if it were a Phase in the Hop List

SOP's for the Italian Campaign

Fly at 300 AGL and Fly Fast

  1. Nothing is required to be flown prior to The Italian Campaign
  2. The P-47D is the aircraft to be used, (any WWII aircraft if you don't have the P-47D)
  3. 4 Pilots in 4 Aircraft is the Minimum number per Leg and they must sign up in advance
  4. 24 hours notice must be given in the Calendar for a Leg to count
  5. All Pilots attending must sign up in advance for the Leg to count

Join the Campaign by sending your Pilot Name and Aircraft Name by email to Lt. Col. Seatime using the link below. If you choose an existing paint from another source, give the direct link to that download in your email. No verbal requests please.

Link to add your Name and Aircraft Name to the Pilot List by emailing to Colonel Seatime 

HOW THE CHECKERTAIL DESIGN ORIGINATED ON THE AIRCRAFT FLOWN BY THE 325TH FIGHTER GROUP

By Colonel Robert Baseler -  leader of the 325th FG

At the time, the 325th FIGHTER GROUP was stationed at Montesquieu, Algeria. The headquarters of the Northwest African Air Force issued a request for all Fighter and Bomber Groups, under its command, to come up with a distinctive identification painted on their aircraft. This way, the Bomber crews would know, on site, which Fighter outfit was escorting them, and conversely, the Fighter Jockeys would know which Bomber Group they were escorting.


I had always been an admirer of Werner Voss, the famous German WWI Fighter Ace, who was also known as the "Checkerboard Ace", because of the wide Checkerboard he had painted around the fuselage of his Fokker DR1 Triplane, a short distance behind the cockpit.

I thought such a distinctive identification would look good on the tail section of our P-40Fs, so we started working on the color scheme. John Watkins worked with me and our first attempt consisted of black and white checks, which at a distance looked all red. We then tried red and white checks, which under the same circumstances, also looked all red.

Finally, we tried black and yellow and they were painted on so that they were ninety degrees to the leading edges of the vertical and horizontal tail surfaces. (The checks were 12" square on the P-40s and P-47s, and 10" square on the P-51s.) Needless to say, you could see that Checkerboard tail almost as far away as you could see the entire aircraft.

Colonel Austin, our Group Commander, really liked the Checkertail design and gave us the go ahead to get it approved. Accordingly, we drew a large scale facsimile of a P-40F tail section, on a big sheet of paper, and painted on the black and yellow checks. It really looked sharp. Major General Carl Spaatz was the Commander of the Northwest African Air Force and John Watkins had known him for years, so John volunteered to take the Checkertail design to Constantine, Algeria, and personally show it to the General.

The rest is history. The General liked the design and John came home with the written approval to use it.

Thanks to http://www.bigwing.net/checker.html

The Italian Campaign, a World War II Tour of Italy

The Italian Campaign of World War II referred to the Allied operations in and around Italy from 1943 to the end of the war and the surrender of German forces in Italy in 1943. We have presented here a tour of some of the war torn cities of Italy as our way of remembering the brave Allied Pilots, Ground Crews, Infantry and Navy who suffered dreadful losses in their efforts to free Italy.

Link to a list of 35 films that were set in or based on the Italian Campaign of WWII

Here are some great YouTube films on the subject:

 

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